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FCM: Fuel Cell Motocycles

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FCM: Fuel Cell Motocycles

Post by toratora » Sat Dec 09, 2017 5:13 am

It's time to open a thread for the fuel cell bikes that are being announced, and introduced. Fuel cells, and the H2 bikes have a clear advantages that make them the most viable alternative for most folks riding ICE (internal combustion engines) based motos today. At this point in time it seems that Suzuki is making the most advancements with H2 bikes, but the other companies are sitting on their asses. It will be most interesting to see these developments unfold.
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FCM: Metropolitan Police trial hydrogen fuel cell scooter

Post by toratora » Sat Dec 09, 2017 5:19 am

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/cars/news/me ... ll-suzuki/
Ed Wiseman wrote:8 SEPTEMBER 2017 • 7:42PM
The Metropolitan Police Service, London's world-famous police force, has started trialling hydrogen fuel cell scooters as part of a wider programme to reduce its emissions.

Suzuki has loaned the seven Burgman motorcycles to the organisation free of charge. They will be based at Alperton Deployment Centre during the 18-month trial and will be used by Police Community Support Officers within the Road and Transport Policing Command.

This type of vehicle uses a fuel cell to convert fuel (in this case, hydrogen) into electricity, which then powers electric motors. The result is a zero-emission vehicle that can be refuelled almost instantly, in contrast to conventional battery electric vehicles which require several hours' charging.

Commander Neil Jerome for Territorial Policing said, “Being the UK’s largest police service we constantly have vehicles on the roads and therefore it is our aim to make our fleet as clean as we can, whilst maintaining operational capability.

“We are thankful to Suzuki and our partners and look forward with optimism about this trial. Through collaborative partnerships and innovative testing such as this, we can gain real-life experience of how we can progress our ambition and create a cleaner fleet that will benefit London and the service we provide.”

The scooters will be refuelled from a private filling station, provided by Fuel Cell Systems. They will have a range of around 75 miles on a single tank.

Suzuki GB Managing Director, Nobuo Suyama, said: “Suzuki are extremely honoured to be able to showcase the Burgman Fuel Cell and gain valuable feedback from this important trial with the Met.

“Operational data from the trial will be gathered and used to support Suzuki zero emission vehicle development programmes. Deploying these vehicles into service with the Met marks a significant milestone in the extensive development of this ground-breaking technology.

“Being able to release the Suzuki Burgman Fuel Cell to the Met has only been made possible by the support of a number of technology partners, including Intelligent Energy Ltd, with whom Suzuki has jointly developed the Fuel Cell unit for the scooter.”

Unfortunately for the UK's many commuters, the fuel cell Burgman scooter is not yet available commercially, and the hydrogen filling infrastructure currently operational in London remains weak. However, the clear practical and environmental advantages of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles mean that their uptake is likely to grow.
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FCM: 2017 China International Motorcycle Fair

Post by toratora » Sat Dec 09, 2017 5:33 am

Image https://newatlas.com/pictorial-2017-chi ... air/51530/
Mike Hanlon wrote:October 2nd, 2017
China's motorcycle market is evolving at a rapid rate, and it could have a profound effect on the form factor of motorcycles of the near future. Although China is no longer the world's largest motorcycle market or the world's largest motorcycle manufacturer (it has now fallen behind India on both counts), it still dwarfs all other national motorcycle markets.

Back to the future

Think of Zongshen as China's equivalent to Honda. One of China's most beloved motorcycle marques, it got its start making motorcycles in Chongqing in 1992. Zuo Zongshen is one of history's greatest rags-to-riches stories, rising from abject poverty to become one of the world's richest people. The Zongshen Group now has 50+ subsidiary companies and has diversified its technological development across many related industries and is well poised to ride the tides of change.

The Zongshen stand in the company's home town featured a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell the company has under development (above). Zongshen also makes the motors for China's military drones and that was another highlight of a truly monumental display.

There was little doubt in walking the floor at CIMA that intellectual property is paid scant regard in China, but that was also the case as Japan's motorcycle industry emerged, and quite soon the technological development torch was carried forth by the former plagiarizers. Wouldn't it be ironic if all those fuel cell prototype motorcycles we've seen at the Tokyo Motor Show for the last decade were beaten to market by the Chinese manufacturers?
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FCM: Global Motorcycle Batteries Market - Trends and Forecasts by Technavio

Post by toratora » Sat Dec 09, 2017 5:41 am

https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/ ... -Forecasts
BUSINESS WIRE wrote: November 21, 2017
Technavio has published a new report on the global motorcycle batteries market from 2017-2021.

Fuel cells to replace batteries in motorcycle
When compared with other advancements, the advancements in battery technologies are moderate. Many organizations across the world are trying to develop fuel cells that can replace batteries. The fuel cell was developed in 1839, and internal combustion engines were also developed at the same time but the impact that both these technologies have today are different.

During the 1960s, the fuel cell was first used in Gemini space program after that it is was used in trial runs in buses and cars during the 1990s. Lower power output, bulky nature, and the high cost of development may be some of the major constraints for the progress.
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FCM: General Motors Commits to an ‘All-Electric Future’ With Sights Set on China

Post by toratora » Sat Dec 09, 2017 5:47 am

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https://www.greentechmedia.com/articles ... gs.yLZm2o0
JULIA PYPER wrote:OCTOBER 03, 2017
GM has been developing fuel-cell technology in partnership with Honda for nearly four years, but has yet to launch a production vehicle. Automakers have long touted the long range and fast-fueling benefits of hydrogen over battery power. But although Honda, Toyota and Hyundai each offer a fuel-cell vehicle in California, those sales numbers barely register. Plus, hydrogen infrastructure has proven to be very expensive and time-consuming to build.

GM plans to begin producing fuel-cell vehicles in 2020 at its Brownstown Battery Assembly plant south of Detroit, Autoweek reports. New plug-in vehicle models will feature an "all-new battery system" that GM featured briefly on Monday at its Technical Center in Warren, Michigan. The presentation came a day before Ford's new CEO Jim Hackett was scheduled to deliver a strategic update.

That vision seems to be aimed specifically at the Chinese market, where policymakers are considering a ban on combustion engine vehicles. GM will roll out at least 10 "new energy vehicles" in China by 2020, Barra said. And by 2025, nearly all models from GM’s global brands in China -- Buick, Cadillac and Chevrolet -- will offer electrification technology. To accommodate that growth, the SAIC-GM joint venture will open a new battery assembly plant in Shanghai this year.

Policies will remain one of the primary drivers of electrification. China, India, France and the United Kingdom are all are considering plans to limit or ban gas- and diesel-powered vehicles between 2030 and 2040. California is also on that list, although the U.S. is lagging on sustainable transportation policy at the national level.

The Trump administration is currently conducting a midterm review of Obama-era fuel economy standards and is expected to try to weaken them. But even if regulations loosen at home, GM -- which now sells more cars in China than the U.S. -- can't escape the policy forces pushing the company toward EVs.

“China is their biggest market,” said Michelle Krebs, analyst at Autotrader, told the Los Angeles Times. “If China decides to go electric, they have to do it.”
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FCM: Hydrogen Best Suited for Alternative Fuel Vehicles, Says Top Indian Scientist

Post by toratora » Sat Dec 09, 2017 5:55 am

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https://sputniknews.com/asia/2017101110 ... -vehicles/
Sputnik wrote:11.10.2017
Hydrogen could become the preferred fuel option to power the next generation of vehicles in India, says a scientist who formerly served the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO).

New Delhi (Sputnik) – The Indian Space Research Organisation had, in fact, come out with a demonstration vehicle which was powered by hydrogen, says former ISRO chief G. Madhavan Nair. Four years ago, India’s Tata Motors and the space agency developed a hydrogen-powered bus after several years of research.

"In the long run, I will say that hydrogen-based thing will be the right choice because hydrogen has to become the fuel of the next generation," Nair told the PTI in an interview.

The big challenge, however, is to adopt the existing hydrogen fuel cell technology in a cost-efficient manner to make them financially viable.

"And how to generate hydrogen in an economical way and then how to make fuel cells…these are some of the technology challenges. We should mount a research and development programme in this regard," Nair added.

The former ISRO chief also raised the issue of disposing of lithium-ion batteries after use in electric vehicles.

“Lithium, you cannot throw it around. That becomes the most polluting thing. There has to be an adequate mechanism for collection and reprocessing," Nair further said.

The former ISRO chief also raised the issue of disposing of lithium-ion batteries after use in electric vehicles.

“Lithium, you cannot throw it around. That becomes the most polluting thing. There has to be an adequate mechanism for collection and reprocessing," Nair further said.

While not ruling out hydrogen-powered vehicles as an option, experts in India suggest that at present lithium-powered electric vehicles are a reality and that cannot be ignored.

“Lithium is already in use and is costly because we have to depend on imports. In India’s case, a bigger challenge is to create an infrastructure for running electric vehicles and charging them. At present, a lot of investment is required. Electric vehicles need the kind of infrastructure like the one needed for petrol cars,” Group Capt (Retd.) Ajey Lele, Senior Fellow, at the Institute for Defence Studies and Analyses told Sputnik.

India is looking at having an all-electric car fleet by 2030 with an express objective of lowering the fuel import bill and the running cost of vehicles.

India’s Minister for Transport Nitin Gadkari has already warned automobile manufacturers in the country that they should go for eco-friendly alternative fuels, else he would 'bulldoze' them.
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FCM: Suzuki to test hydrogen motorcycle on public roads

Post by toratora » Sat Dec 09, 2017 5:59 am

https://asia.nikkei.com/Business/Compan ... blic-roads
Nikkei wrote:December 27, 2015
TOKYO -- Japanese automaker Suzuki Motor plans to commercialize a hydrogen-powered fuel cell motorcycle, with plans to start testing it on public roads next year.

Japan's transport ministry is expected to write safety and environmental standards for fuel cell bikes as early as January; they would be the world's first such regulations. Once approved, Suzuki will begin test-driving the cycle on public roads.

Fuel cells are considered a trump card for automakers trying to make vehicles that don't belch exhaust. The Mirai fuel cell vehicle, developed by Japan's Toyota Motor, is the latest example of the zero-emission technology. Suzuki hopes to turn its fuel cell two-wheeler into one of its major products.

It already has a joint venture with Intelligent Energy Holdings, a U.K. venture company, that will produce a Burgman fuel cell scooter. The high-pressure hydrogen tank is small enough for a motorcycle. The first Burgman scooter will be based on Suzuki's existing 120cc model.

Suzuki also intends to develop compact four-wheel vehicles that run on hydrogen.

While Toyota's Mirai has already hit roads around the world, safety and other standards have yet to catch up. The Japanese transport ministry will set terms for safety concerns specific to fuel cell motorcycles, such as requiring makers to design the bikes so that their hydrogen tanks are protected, even in accidents. Suzuki plans to commercialize its motorcycle once it receives ministry approval.
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FCM: Alternative Power Concept: Fuel-Cell Suzuki

Post by toratora » Sat Dec 09, 2017 6:04 am

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https://www.motorcyclistonline.com/hydr ... -to#page-2
Ben Purvis wrote:October 1, 2015
Hydrogen-Powered Off-Roader Under Development

While other firms are showing an increasing interest in battery-powered electric bikes, Suzuki has long been a supporter of hydrogen fuel cells and its latest designs shows work on an off-roader developed around that technology.

Suzuki’s latest detailed designs show an off-road machine with a fuel cell, motor, and hydrogen tank that appear virtually identical to those used in the small run of fuel cell-powered Burgman scooters made in 2011. (Similar parts were also used in the company’s 2007 Crosscage concept.)

What has changed is the layout. The cylindrical hydrogen tank has been mounted vertically in the new motocrosser, rather than horizontally as on earlier designs, with the fuel cell itself directly in front of the tank and the electric motor below. The layout is more compact and also allows for the components to be easily protected by the cage-like frame that extends from the otherwise-conventional chassis around them; preventing hydrogen leaks is a high priority.

As with other electric off-roaders like KTM’s Freeride E, the Suzuki should offer the benefit of being virtually silent, allowing it to be used in places where conventional ‘crossers might raise objections from neighbors. And with pure water as its only emission, there’s nothing to discourage indoor use either.
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Suzuki’s latest detailed designs show an off-road machine with a fuel cell, motor, and hydrogen tank that appear virtually identical to those used in the small run of fuel cell-powered Burgman scooters made in 2011.
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FCM: Hydrogen Powered Bike Has 60 Mi Range, 2 Min Fill Time

Post by toratora » Sat Dec 09, 2017 6:09 am

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https://gas2.org/2017/11/05/hydrogen-po ... fill-time/
Jo Borrás wrote:November 5th, 2017

First launched as a proof of concept for its compact hydrogen fuel cell technology back in 2014, Pragma Industries believes its pedal-assist electric bicycle is- finally!- ready for prime time. The French company signaled its intent to sell bikes to the mainstream European commuter, too, with a 100 km (62 mile) and a “charge time” of just 2 minutes.

I put “charge time” in scare quotes because the Pragma Aplha isn’t a conventional, battery-powered ebike. Instead, it’s powered by a hydrogen fuel cell (that one, up there, specifically). A fuel cell that, the company claims, offers a number of significant advantages over conventional batteries- advantages that include more consistent range and performance in extreme hot and cold weather and a more accurate H2 gauge that’s better at accurately communicating remaining energy and range to the bike’s rider.

Granted, the bike has a number of problems facing its widespread adoption. Hydrogen might not be as clean as many people think, for starters, and- despite a number of very smart, “in the know” people saying hydrogen is the future– the infrastructure necessary to fill the Alpha simply isn’t there (at least, not yet).

There was no word in any of the source materials I read about pricing or US availability for the Pragma Alpha, either- which is just as well. Cool as the technology might be, this is little more than a moped in that you’re still attached to a filling station. Still, it’s a tightly engineered package that’s worth a look.
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FCM: Suzuki set to be first with production fuel cell motorcycle

Post by toratora » Sat Dec 09, 2017 6:16 am

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http://www.motorcyclenews.com/news/new- ... torcycle-/
Ben Purvis wrote:27 March 2008
Suzuki and British firm Intelligent Energy have announced an extension of their agreement to develop hydrogen fuel-cell motorcycles with the intention of creating a production-ready hydrogen-powered bike in the near future.

The colaboration between the two firms bore fruit last autumn with the showing of the Suzuki Crosscage motorcycle, a hydrogen fuel-cell powered concept bike with similar performance to a 125cc machine.

Hydrogen power means the only emission from the Crosscage is pure water.

“This is an important next step for our collaboration with Suzuki as we move from a very successful concept toward a range of commercially viable fuel cell motorcycles,” said Phil Caldwell, director of business development at Intelligent Energy:

“We have developed an excellent relationship with Suzuki over the past two years and this agreement further strengthens our partnership.”

“Our fuel cells are efficient, robust, and emit zero carbon at the tailpipe”, added Henri Winand, chief executive of Intelligent Energy.

“Both Intelligent Energy and Suzuki are committed to the development of cleaner and more responsible vehicles for the consumer.

The Crosscage is an example of what can be achieved when invention meets ambition, and we’re looking forward to the next phase in the relationship.”
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